Young people, be responsible

by | May 1, 2020

Europe for the future – Future for Europe. František Talíř is 27; when he speaks about democracy and reforms, his enthusiasm is contagious.   “Since 1989, we have experienced the freshness of democracy and freedom even in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Joining the EU as well as travelling and working in other Countries bear […]

Europe for the future – Future for Europe. František Talíř is 27; when he speaks about democracy and reforms, his enthusiasm is contagious.  

“Since 1989, we have experienced the freshness of democracy and freedom even in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Joining the EU as well as travelling and working in other Countries bear witness to this. It must be borne in mind, nevertheless, that the Countries that used to form part of the Eastern Block have a different mentality and culture than that of the Western European ones. Co-habitation is still marked by tensions, and, now, Covid-19 has shown that our privileges are not that evident”.

František is a historian and much involved in politics. At the last elections, his party chose him as a candidate for the European Parliament in Brussels, and in the next regional elections he will be the main candidate for the Christian Democratic Union of Slovakia.

“Above all, we young people ought to be interested in what happens in Europe and in the world, and then take initiatives, for example, to vote or to be active in a political party. It’s not democracy that needs to be changed, but the persons who shape democracy”. According to František, the journey is a long one; however, what is important is to start with one’s self, and not try unloading one’s responsibility on others. “I do not subscribe to all that Fridays for Future entails. Nevertheless, the young people succeeded to highlight a problem and to elicit a reaction from persons of all generations”.

František Talíř invites all persons to be aware of their roots in order to give a future to Europe. “I’ve read what the Father Founders of Europe wrote. Adenauer, De Gasperi and Schuman faced by far greater difficulties following the Second World War than the ones we are facing today. And yet, together, they did great things”.

Beatriz Lauenroth

František Talíř took part in the meeting of  ‘Friends ofTogether for Europe’ that was held in Prague in 2018.

The entire interview of František Talíř with Maria Motykova is available (In Czech, Slovak and German) on: Podcast Europa per il futuro – Futuro per l’Europa

 

 

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